A group of burmese gathered in front of the Prime Minister Office on Friday afternoon (local time) and called for the UK government to carry out an Independently investigate the horrific murders of Hannah Witheridge and David Miller, found dead on Thailand’s touristic island of Koh Tao. 
 
 
Photo by Sirada Kemnittatha
 
Photo by Sirada Kemnittatha
 
 
 
Photo by Sirada Kemnittatha
 
Dear All Myanmar around the World & the International Community,
 
We would like to invite you to join hands in hands with this unfair accusation of the murder case by Thai Police & Authority. The International and local community are now not able to trust that the two Myanmar nationals, Zaw Lin and Win Zaw Htun, have not had their confessions forced out of them or that evidence against them has not been tampered with. As such we cannot also trust that they are responsible. This being said, we demand a full independent investigation to be conducted by the government of the United Kingdom into these deaths. This is in the hope that the families of these victims may know justice has been served, and that the deaths of two more possible innocents might be avoided. 
 
Migrant workers, particularly from neighbouring Myanmar, have been used as scapegoats for crimes in Thailand. We, "Myanmar Community from United Kingdom and the Whole World" are urging the British Government to carry out an Independently investigate the horrific murders of Hannah Witheridge and David Miller and save these two innocent Myanmar nationalities please. the Thai police have tortured Win and Saw into signing false confessions. Aung Myo Thant, a Burmese lawyer who is part of a legal team sent by the Burmese Embassy in Bangkok, has witnessed firsthand multiple bruises on the falsely accused and has been refused access to a third man in custody, Maung Maung, a friend of the accused that is being used by the police as a witness.
 
It has been reported that Maung Maung has been badly beaten by the police and it is both highly suspicious and clearly obvious why they won’t allow him access to a lawyer or the media. 
 
Please kindly turn up and show your Solidarity with Myanmar Community in UK & around the World please.
 
 
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Two men have filed a lèse majesté complaint against Sulak Sivaraksa, a renowned royalist and lèse majesté critic, for a public speech about King Naresuan, who ruled the Ayutthaya Kingdom 400 years ago.
 
According to Chao Phraya News, Lt Gen Padung Niwatwan and Lt Gen Pittaya Vimalin filed the complaint at Chanasongkram Police Station on Thursday. They accused Sulak of defaming the former king during a public speech on “Thai History: the Construction and Deconstruction” on 5 October at Thammasat University, Bangkok. 
 
In the speech, Sulak said the legend of the elephant battle between Naresuan and a Burmese king was constructed. He also criticized the personality of the legendary Ayutthaya king for being cruel.  
 
The notorious lèse majesté law or Article 112 of the Criminal Code clearly states "Whoever defames, insults or threatens the King, Queen, Heir-apparent or Regent shall be punished (with) imprisonment of three to fifteen years." 
 
This is the second lèse majesté case related to a past monarch. In late 2013, the Supreme Court handed out a landmark verdict in a lèse majesté case in which the defendant was found guilty of defaming King Rama IV, who reigned between 1851 and 1868, surprising lawyers and academics who have always understood that the law does not cover former kings. 
 
According to Wikipedia, Naresuan, who ruled over the Ayutthaya Kingdom from 1590 to 1605, was one of Siam's most revered monarchs as he was known for his campaigns to free Siam from Burmese rule. During his reign numerous wars were fought against Burma. 
 
Several films and soap operas have been made about the monarch. The most recent are the Legend of King Naresuan, comprising five movies telling the story of the young Naresuan till his death. One movie in the series was dedicated to the elephant battle alone.
 
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The military arrested and filed a lèse majesté charge against a 67-year-old man for writing messages in a shopping mall’s restrooms. The messages mainly criticized the junta and Article 112, or the lèse majesté law, and allegedly made reference to the King. He is likely to be tried in a military court 
 
The messages mainly criticized the junta leader Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha and the Democrat government which ruled the country from 2011 to 2013. They condemned the two governments for abusing Article 112.  
 
One of the messages reads: “The government of clowns that robbed the nation, led by f*** Prayuth. They have issued ridiculous policies of amateur comedians. Their main job is to use the monarchy (uncle [censored by Prachatai*]). Their main weapon is Article 112. I’m sick of seeing your face [Prayuth] every day. It tells me that you [Prayuth] are near the end because of the looming internal conflict.”
 
*The censored phrase, allegedly a reference to the King, merely describes a physical description of a person. 
 
At around 3 pm on Wednesday, security guards of the Seacon Square Shopping Mall in eastern Bangkok captured Opas C. after he allegedly wrote messages on the walls of three men’s restrooms in the mall and fined him 2,000 baht. Later in the evening the mall contacted the military to detain him. 
 
On Friday, the military brought him to the Crime Suppression Division (CSD) office and filed charges under Article 112 against him. 
 
At the press conference, Opas, sitting next to Lt Col Burin Thongprapai from the military’s Judge Advocate General’s Office, said he wrote the messages because Thai politics stressed him out and that he was frustrated with the coup and the junta. 
 
The reporters further asked what his view toward the monarchy was. He said he was merely curious why the monarchy enjoyed so much privilege. He told the media that he listened to pro-democracy community radio FM 88.5. 
 
However, Opas told Prachatai in a phone interview after the press briefing that the community radio station has actually been defunct for two years and that Burin instructed him to say that he was brainwashed by the radio station. 
 
He added that he wanted to merely criticize the junta. 
 
Lt Col Burin Thongpraphai, staff member of the Judge Advocate General’s Office, who brought the suspect to the CSD, told reporters that “the comments that the suspects made were clear. He can criticise the government, but not the monarchy. There will be many people like this if people consume news without filtering.” 
 
Lt Col Burin said Opas will be tried in military court.
 
Opas has been detained at the CSD.
 

 

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Please read the updated report here

The military arrested and filed a lese majeste charge against a 67-year-old man for writing messages deemed defaming the monarchy in a shopping mall’s restrooms.

Opas C., was captured by the mall’s employee on Wednesday and was later arrested by the military.

On Friday, the military brought him to the crime suppression unit and filed a charge under Article 112, or the lese majeste law, against him. He confessed that he wrote the message.

The messages deemed lese majeste were written on three restrooms of the Secon Square shopping mall in eastern Bangkok .

Asked by reporters why he wrote such messages, the old man replied “the politics stressed me out” added that he was frustrated living under the junta.

The reporters further asked what he thinks about the monarchy, he said he was merely curious whether the monarchy enjoyed so much privileges. He said he listened to a pro-democracy community radio FM 88.5, which questioned the role of the anti-election People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC) movement, which led him to writing such comments.

According to a phone interview with Opas by Prachatai, however, Opas said that Lieu Col Burin was trying to instruct him to admit that he wrote the lese majeste messages because of the now defunct pro-democracy community radio he listened to, that has been closed down two years ago. He added that he only wanted to criticise the political stance of the Democrat Party.

One of the messages: “The comedian government that robbed the nation, led by f*** Prayuth. They have issued ridiculous policies of amature comedians. Their main job is to use the monarchy (The uncle --censored by Prachatai*--). Their main weapon is the Article 112. You***I’m sick of see your face everyday. It tells me that you are near the end because of the looming internal conflict.”

*The censored phrase, allegedly is the reference to the King, merely described a physical description of ‘the uncle’.  

Lieu Col Burin Thongpraphai, the staff judge advocate who brought the suspect to the police at the Crime Suppression Division told reporters that “the comments that the suspects made was clear. He could criticise the government, but not the monarchy. There will be many people like this if people consume the news without filtering.”

The staff judge advocate said Opas will be tried in the military court.

The shopping mall also demanded Opas for 2,000 baht of compensation from writing the messages. 

 

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The attendance of Thailand’s junta Prime Minister General Prayuth Chan-ocha at the 10th Asia-Europe Meeting (ASEM) in Milan has promted Thais to take action to either protest against his arrival or to display support for him as the political polarization among Thais extends abroad, writes Saksith Saiyasombut. “Dittatore NON sei benvenuto!” – The message in Italian makes it Read more...