General Wut Liptapanlop, adviser to the Royal Thai Police, and other senior personnel, visited Pattaya police station for a meeting on local traffic chaos. It was agreed that those who break traffic laws should be punished and that overcrowding problems on the roads should be reduced by 10 percent a month. Police General Wut called [...] Read more...
Officers of the corrections department, aided by navy personnel from Sattahip, conducted a thorough search of Pattaya Remand Prison to check for drugs and other signs of illegal activity. However, they found nothing to incriminate inmates either in cells or public areas in spite of a most intensive check. Urine samples were collected from 300 [...] Read more...
ThaiPBS had this slightly confusingly worded article: Former Democrat party leader Abhisit Vejjajiva warned the National Council for Peace and Order to not introduce any broad-ranging amnesty law which will cover more offenders rather than the coup makers otherwise there may be chaos. He pointed out that the last political conflict in this country was Read more...
Following on from the arrest of two Debt Collectors by Pattaya Police and the Navy early on Sunday Morning, the ringleader of the operation, who is based in Chanthaburi Province, has now been arrested. On Monday afternoon, the Thai Navy in conjunction with Banglamung District Officials visited the home of Khun Siriwattana aged 37, who is suspected of running the Illegal Pattaya Money Lending business which saw the arrest of Khun Pongsagorn aged 20 and Khun Wattana aged 26 on … Continue reading Read more...
Officers from the Crime Suppression Division arrested a 26 year old man wanted in connection with serious class 1 drug dealing offenses from a case dating back to December 2013. Officers arrested Khun Anusorn at the market on the strength of arrest warrant number 13/2557 dated 9th January 2014 and issued by the Nakhon Sawan Provincial Court. On 2nd December 2013 he was suspected of being part of a gang of three men selling drugs in Nakhon Sawan Province in … Continue reading Read more...
BANGKOK, 21 July 2014: Thailand will waive the tourist visa fee for Chinese and Taiwanese visitors for three months, starting 1 August, to support tourism recover. The country’s governing National Council for Peace and Order confirmed, last week, the decision following recommendations presented by leading tourism associations. Private sector agencies comprising Thai Chamber of Commerce, [...] Read more...
BANGKOK, 21 July 2014: TripAdvisor claims its latest study shows that consumer interest in visiting holiday destinations in Thailand is on the rise, especially in long-haul, emerging markets. The world’s largest travel site bases its assumption on a study that examined markets in which travellers have shown the largest increase in year-on-year interest in Thai [...] Read more...
Harrison George

Well you can’t argue facts with an Imam, can you? 

There’s no need to worry about crime in Saudi Arabia, he said, and he’s been there.  Women don’t go in fear of rape because they have the death penalty for it.  And that is Sharia law, the law of God, which cannot be changed by man.  So that’s alright then.

Though hang on a minute.  Women also don’t have the right to drive in Saudi.  Maybe that’s why they don’t get raped.  And until now, they’ve not had the right to vote.  Could that be the determining factor?  Well we’ll find out next year when Saudi woman finally get to stand and vote in elections.  If the rape statistics go up, then it’s clear that women will have to be re-disenfranchised for their own safety. 

Though there are in fact rapes in Saudi Arabia.  Rape statistics must always be viewed with extreme circumspection due to massive under-reporting, but one estimate for Saudi Arabia in 1988 put the rate at 21.9 per 100,000 population.  That’s comparable to countries like Norway and Finland that haven’t had the death penalty for years and much higher than other spineless abolitionist states like Canada. 

One famous case in Saudi in 2006 involved a woman who was gang-raped.  Her attackers were imprisoned, but so was she – for being alone in a car with a male who was not a relative. 

But just a minute.  What happened to the death penalty for rape?  Ah well, you see, the court said there wasn’t really the evidence.  It was just the word of the woman (now a convicted felon) and the video of the attack that one of the rapists took on his mobile phone, but for some reason that couldn’t be admitted as evidence.

And after this travesty of injustice (but excellent anti-rape deterrence), the woman appealed.  Her sentence was increased after the charge against her was changed to adultery, and lying to the police was tacked on.

She was eventually given a Royal Pardon, though King Abdullah said there was nothing wrong with the way the courts had behaved (which also included yanking the defence lawyer’s licence).

But never mind.  This kind of publicity will keep the number of rapes down.  If women know they will be punished for being raped, they will make every effort to avoid it, thereby reducing the statistics.  Or at least avoid reporting it, which amounts to the same thing.

But the lesson for Thailand is clear.  If we wish to prevent further cases like that of the 13-year-old who was raped, murdered and thrown out of the window of an express train, we need, like India, to make laws based on the reaction of the faceless Facebook masses to sensational cases and institute the death penalty for rape.

And if the deterrent effect of the death penalty is so strong, I wonder why we should stop there. 

Corruption has been the crime du jour of the outraged middle classes even before Thaksin took up politics.  And for all the huffing and puffing, the statistics don’t show any improvement.  Why not make it a capital offence and give the bribe-givers and bribe-takers something to think about?

Saudi Arabia, our supposed exemplar, uses the death penalty not just for murder and rape, but also for armed robbery, drug use, witchcraft, abandoning Islam, and adultery.  Maybe the last one won’t be suitable for Thailand (not unless we really want to reduce the population figures), but the rest are worth considering.

As is their preferred method of execution – beheading.  In a public place.  As in the days of Siam of yore, so it would be culturally appropriate.  And in Saudi they cut the heads off 17-year-olds, with a salutary effect on juvenile delinquency, I’m sure.

With a few changes to the laws and some strong-minded judges, Thailand could easily emulate Saudi Arabia and rank among the top 5 judicial killer countries in the world.

And while we’re talking about taekwondo, the use of physical assault as a disciplinary measure seems to have won general approval in Thai society (‘my parents/teachers/trainers beat the crap out of me when I did wrong and look what a broad-minded, sympathetic, logical person it made me’).  It is only natural that if we have capital punishment, we ought to have corporal punishment as well. 

It is rumoured that many in the educational system still hanker for the days when they could beat children.  Well, beat them legally, because many never really stopped.  So I look to the Ministry of Education for general guidance on this, with a tariff of how many punches, slaps, kicks and strokes to designated parts of the underling’s body should be assigned for each offence. 

And these do not have to be actual crimes.  Bodily pain should be inflicted for things like schoolchildren forgetting their homework, office minions caught playing Candy Crush during working hours, columnists not meeting their deadlines, …

Er, hang on a minute.

 


About author:  Bangkokians with long memories may remember his irreverent column in The Nation in the 1980's. During his period of enforced silence since then, he was variously reported as participating in a 999-day meditation retreat in a hill-top monastery in Mae Hong Son (he gave up after 998 days), as the Special Rapporteur for Satire of the UN High Commission for Human Rights, and as understudy for the male lead in the long-running ‘Pussies -not the Musical' at the Neasden International Palladium (formerly Park Lane Empire).

 

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Thailand’s military government has further tightened its grip on the country’s media by banning criticism of the junta, threatening to shut down the offending media outlet and legal consequences. The edict came at a time when probably not many were listening. On Friday night, shortly after the weekly, self-adulating TV address by army chief and Read more...
The Washington Post in an editorial: Despite the army’s desperate attempt to win over the public — through a “happiness” campaign of free haircuts, concerts and World Cup telecasts — these autocratic reforms will be rejected by a majority of the country. The rural poor, having lived through two coups and two major protest crackdowns, Read more...
In the early hours of Sunday a Russian Woman and her Boyfriend were walking back to their Hotel when they were robbed by two Cambodians. The incident occurred on Pattaya Beach Road close to the entrance of Soi 6 at 1.20am. Miss Nadezda Bokova aged 31 and her Boyfriend were suddenly confronted by two Cambodians on a motorbike. As the assailants drove past the pair, the passenger leant over and snatched a bag which was over the left shoulder of … Continue reading Read more...
In the early hours of Sunday, Pattaya Police in conjunction with the Royal Thai Navy received information of a gathering of modified vehicles in Central Pattaya and went to investigate. A total of 11 vehicles were seized and 11 drivers aged between 20 and 27 were arrested after it became evident that a street race had been organized and attempts to illegally close the road were made prior to the authorities arriving. The 11 drivers are facing a variety of … Continue reading Read more...